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THE PRINTABLE CRAFTS BLOG

This is the Anni Arts blog dedicated to printable crafts. I want to share my passion with you and pass on tips, ideas, photos and articles for inspiring printables. I will also post articles about other crafts, folk art, design and art, as well as updates on many products that feature the Anni Arts designs.

Tuesday, January 8, 2013

Teacup of the Week

JANUARY BIRTHFLOWER AND GEM CRADLE TEACUP CARD


The Anni Arts shaped teacup cradle cards are called that because the saucer forms a curved bottom. The January Birthflower and Gem pair is the Carnation and the Garnet.

Each Black-and-White dotty teacup has a separate little silver, enamel and gem teaspoon that tucks into the saucer.  An optional tea packet and tag for a real teabag can peep from a posy of deep pink Carnations. This is a great card-n-gift idea. Embellishments and a lavish envelope are included too.
See the coordinating products too at Anni Arts

Monday, January 7, 2013

Mug of the Week



Ceramic Birthflower and Gem Mugs

The January Birthflower and Gem pair is the Carnation and the Garnet.

The Anni Arts printable 3D papercraft mugs now also have their counterparts as pretty real-life mugs. The illustrations of the popular printable crafts ranges are now on coordinating Birthflower and Gem ceramic beverage mugs.



Anni Arts January Birthflower and Gem ceramic mugs

A Birthflower and Gem mug in a real or paper version is perfect as a birthday gift for somebody you know (or to yourself - sipping a favourite beverage while crafting a paper version seems like a good idea.)

But women also like to collect products featuring the Birthflower and Gem of their birth month all through the year, so there is no need to wait for the birthday to roll by. Moms, Grannies, Aunts, Sisters, Nieces, Cousins and Friends will all appreciate a Birthflower and Gem mug. And they are perfect for Mother's Day gifts too!

The real mugs also combine perfectly with the printables for nice combo gifts. See the coordinating paper products too at Anni Arts

Friday, March 2, 2012

EASTER THEME

ANNI ARTS EASTER CHICK

This Easter range has printable crafts with a very decorative chicken, tulips and eggs in spring yellow, turquoise and hot pink.


There are two sets with lots of printables for cards, table items, choc wraps, labels, tags, bag toppers  and egg wraps.


There is also the Anni Arts 3D egg decoration.

The table items include a bowl, serviette ring and egg cups for small choc eggs.

Cheerful spring goodies!


• Get the Anni Arts archive freebies from the Art Mail newsletter
Not a subscriber yet? Subscribe and then come back and follow the links for the special blog freebies.

Anni Arts has professionally designed and illustrated printable crafts, templates and graphics specially created for crafters by designer Anneke Lipsanen http://www.anniarts.com/


Find unique cardmaking kits, templates, scrapbooking, chocwrappers, wedding stationery, favors and ebooks to download and print. There's a super Anni Arts Printable Crafts Club, and many Freebies for Art Mail Subscribers too. The designs have the Crafter's license included to sell genuine handmade goods. And if you like the designs, but are not a crafter, there are many ready goods and online scrapbooks to order.

http://www.anniarts.com/

Tuesday, February 28, 2012

CRAFT BOXES

ANNI ARTS CRAFT TEMPLATES

An elegant truffle box that is also very easy to make!
It is part of the Funpacks Collection (below) of craft boxes and containers for gifts and favors.
Wrapped chocolates, luxury truffles, small Easter eggs and other sweeties all make a super gift when presented in this versatile box. Print the template on plain cardstock or patterned background papers and decorate to your heart's content.

Great for Mother's Day, Easter, Birthdays, Events and Holidays.






• Get the Anni Arts archive freebies from the Art Mail newsletter.
Not a subscriber yet? Subscribe and then come back and follow the links for the special blog freebies.

Anni Arts has professionally designed and illustrated printable crafts, templates and graphics specially created for crafters by designer Anneke Lipsanen http://www.anniarts.com/


Find unique cardmaking kits, templates, scrapbooking, chocwrappers, wedding stationery, favors and ebooks to download and print. There's a super Anni Arts Printable Crafts Club, and many Freebies for Art Mail Subscribers too. The designs have the Crafter's license included to sell genuine handmade goods. And if you like the designs, but are not a crafter, there are many ready goods and online scrapbooks to order.


http://www.anniarts.com/

Monday, February 27, 2012

ANNI ARTS MUGS

ANNI ARTS MUGS


The unique Anni Arts printable 3D mug has a nifty assembly mechanism which I designed to eliminate the difficulties of making round paper craft objects with a base.

Many of the Anni Arts ranges have their paper mugs.
The popular Birthflower and Gem collection has mugs for each flower of the month.
They even have little "latte" spoons just like some ceramic mugs have.
And tags, tea bag and gift card envelopes for little gifts with the special keepsake paper craft.

Below is the March Birth flower and Gem paper mug.
The flower for March is the Daffodil and the Birthstone is the Aquamarine.


The mug set has four pages of craft printables and includes the 3D paper craft mug, a variety of spoons with different messages, a gingham lining for the mug, tags and envelopes for tea and credit-sized gift cards. The lining paper can also be printed for other craft background paper.
Choose from a gem-studded handle or plain gingham one.


The paper mugs also have real ceramic mugs for birthday girls that want both.
I am busy adding them to all the birth flower months.



• Get the Anni Arts archive freebies from the Art Mail newsletter


Not a subscriber yet? Subscribe and then come back and follow the links for the special blog freebies.


Anni Arts has professionally designed and illustrated printable crafts, templates and graphics specially created for crafters by designer Anneke Lipsanen http://www.anniarts.com/


Find unique cardmaking kits, templates, scrapbooking, chocwrappers, wedding stationery, favors and ebooks to download and print. There's a super Anni Arts Printable Crafts Club, and many Freebies for Art Mail Subscribers too. The designs have the Crafter's license included to sell genuine handmade goods. And if you like the designs, but are not a crafter, there are many ready goods and online scrapbooks to order.
 http://www.anniarts.com/

Thursday, November 25, 2010

TOILE DE JOUY

 
To celebrate my new Reindeer Toile de Jouy and Nordic Braids printables above, I am posting a brief description of Toile de Jouy. Subscribers get a free tag sample plus Free Friday braid labels for Christmas products and Happy Xmas in many languages!
(See the thumbnails of the Freebies below the post)

• The printable crafts login links for free Weekend Wrappers and Free Fridays are only active FROM this blog, but use the same subscriber password.
• Don't miss the free vintage Thanksgiving Weekend Wrappers. Login here
• Don't miss the Free Friday Nordic Braid Labels. Login here
• Get the Reindeer Toile tag freebies here from the Art Mail newsletter. (And the Anni Arts archive freebies)
Not a subscriber yet? Subscribe and then come back and follow the links for the special blog freebies.

This article is a synopsis from the Quilter's Muse Virtual Museum by Patricia Cummings.
Do stop by there for more interesting Toile history and facts http://www.quiltersmuse.com/toile.html 

Toile (pronounced twahl) means "cloth" in French. “Toile de Jouy,” or “toiles de Jouy,” are terms that refer to fabric that was first manufactured at a factory in Jouy-en-Josas, a village located southwest of Paris, near Versailles. Founded in 1760 by German-born Christophe-Philippe Oberkampf, (1738-1815), a textile entrepreneur, the factory site was chosen primarily because of its proximity to the clear running water of the Bièvre River.


At first, the Oberkampf factory produced only floral designs block printed with wood blocks.


The size of the wood blocks limited the design area, as they were only about 10” large. Each was engraved with a mirror image of the finished design. Printing fabric via a hand-stamping method was a long and tedious process, and it was not long before inventors were seeking other more viable methods.

In 1752, Francis Nixon, of Dublin, Ireland, discovered that engraved copperplates and a cylinder system could transfer designs to cloth. This required less manpower than wood block printing, and was therefore, more cost effective. An added benefit of copperplate printing is that the design area repeat could span up to as much as a yard. The copperplates themselves measured 45" wide. Oberkampf, wanting to stay abreast of new technology, obtained a Swiss machine capable of printing fabric using copper engravings. Drawings produced from copper were more precise and detailed than those produced from carved wood. In 1770, changes in copperplate engraving led to monochromatic printing.


The Oberkampf name quickly became synonymous with the word "toile.” The factory became famous for its monochromatic toiles which were printed in red, blue, or black, on a white or cream background. Even though four other countries produced toile fabric, as well as three other French factories, located in Alsace, Nantes, and Rouen, to this day “toile de Jouy” is the name that remains.


French royalty were among Oberkampf’s strongest supporters who enjoyed it for home decorating. Toile was suitable for bedhangings, draperies, pillows, and slip covers. Cloth of the same design and colorway was used to decorate a whole room.This look, at the time, was considered to be the height of elegance.


When toile fabric was first made in France, idyllic scenes featuring the French countryside were predominant. These motifs showed people at work and at leisure. Hunting scenes, which depicted a favorite pastime of the well-to-do, were favorites.


Pastoral scenes depicted in the toile fabric coincided with the idealistic views of Marie Antoinette who was a fan of the writings of Jean-Jacques Rousseau. In 1783, King Louis XVI proclaimed the Oberkampf factory to be the Manufacture Royale de Jouy.


In addition, thematic depictions related to Roman or Greek mythology were popular because they were pleasing to a well-read audience of well-educated men who had studied the Classics. Architectural motifs of buildings were also in the mix of toile prints.


The Textile Museum in Mulhouse, one of the museums where the designs are preserved, allows access to them so that new toile fabric can be produced.

Get these freebies: two sheets of braid labels and two tags from Reindeer Toile de Jouy and Nordic braids
 



And don't forget wo vintage Thanksgiving wrappers for you from last week's Weekend Wrappers

In the mean time: subscribe and come back to follow the links for some free choc wrappers.

Anni Arts has professionally designed and illustrated printable crafts, templates and graphics specially created for crafters by designer Anneke Lipsanen http://www.anniarts.com//


Don't miss the Weekend Wrapper series free on this blog. Chocolate wrappers from Vintage graphics with many themes for all occasions! Nothing beats a nice choc slab as a quick gift. Start collecting your arsenal of wrappers.
Find unique cardmaking kits, templates, scrapbooking, chocwrappers, wedding stationery, favors and ebooks to download and print. There's a super Anni Arts Printable Crafts Club, Licenses for Home Business Crafters and many Freebies for Art Mail Subscribers too. And if you like the designs, but are not a crafter, there are many ready goods and online scrapbooks to order.
http://www.anniarts.com/



Friday, November 12, 2010

THE HISTORY OF CHOCOLATE 2

• The printable crafts login links for free Weekend Wrappers and Free Fridays are only active FROM this blog, but use the same subscriber password.
• Don't miss the free vintage Weekend Wrappers. Login here
• Don't miss the Free Friday goodies either.Login here
• Not a subscriber yet? Get new Anni Arts product alerts and specials, as well as the newsletter freebies. Subscribe and then come back and follow the links for the special blog freebies.

Two vintage Thanksgiving wrappers for you this week
CHOCOLATE COMES TO EUROPE
The introduction of cocoa into Europe, as well as its cultivation for the European market, was due to the Jesuit missionaries rather than to the explorers of the Western Hemisphere. It was the monks, too, who about 1661 made it known in France.


It is curious, therefore, to notice the debate that at one time raged among ecclesiastics as to whether it was lawful to make use of chocolate in Lent and whether it was to be regarded as food or drink. A consensus of opinion on the subject, published in Venice in 1748, states that "All agree that he will break his fast who eats any portion of chocolate, which, dissolved and well mixed with warm water, is not prejudicial to keeping a fast."


In a story told in Gaze's "New Survey of the West Indies" published in 1648, the Bishop of Chiapa, was disturbed by the use of chocolate during the performance of the Mass. "The women of that city, it seems, pretend much weakness and squeamishness of stomacke, which they say is so great that they are not able to continue in church while the mass is briefly hurried over, much lesse while a solemn high mass is sung and a sermon preached, unles they drinke a cup of hot chocolatte and eat a bit of sweetmeats to strengthen their stomackes."

Their maids brought them a cup of chocolate in the middle of the sermon, much to the annoyance of the bishop and the priests "interrupting both mass and sermon". One day there was such an uproar when the priests tried to take the chocolate from the maids, that swords were drawn against the priests. Bishop Chiapa, who so rigorously had forbidden chocolate to be drunk in the church, was poisoned!

The "chocolatte-confectioning Doñas" resolved to forsake the Cathedral, preferring in stead to go to the Cloister Churches, where the Nuns and Friars were not troubled by the chocolate. It was only natural that the nuns and friars of the cloister churches did not raise objections to this practice of chocolate drinking, for we read further that two of these cloisters were "talked off far and near, not for their religious practices, but for their skill in making drinkes which are used in those parts, the one called chocolatte, another atolle. Chocolatte is (also) made up in boxes, and sent not only to Mexico, but much of it yearly transported to Spain."

The English and Hollanders at first made little use of it. About the time of the Commonwealth, however, the new drink began to make its way among the English, and the Public Advertiser of 1657 contains the notice that "in Bishopsgate Street, in Queen's Head Alley, at a Frenchman's house, is an excellent drink, called chocolate, to be sold, where you may have it ready at any time, and also unmade, at reasonable rates."

These rates appear to have been from 10s to 15s a pound, a price which made chocolate, rather than coffee, the beverage of the aristocracy, who flocked to the chocolate-houses soon to spring up in the fashionable centres. The chocolate-houses were thus the forerunners of modern clubs, and one of them, "The Cocoa Tree" which was the early headquarters of the Jacobite party, subsequently became recognised as the club of the literati, including among its members such men as Byron. White's Cocoa House – at one time a great gambling centre –adjoining St. James' Palace, eventually developed into the respectable White's Club.


Curiously, chocolate was at first regarded as an afrodisiac in Europe.
In 1712, after its use had become established in England, the mentor of the Spectator wrote: "I shall also advise my fair readers to be in a particular manner careful how they meddle with romances, chocolates, novels, and the like inflamers, which I look upon as very dangerous to be made use of during this great carnival" (the month of May).


As early as 1712 a London doctor warned against the ill-effects of sugar added to cocoa, declaring that cocao, which is a medicine, had become a poison since sugar was added to make it delicious. A pamphlet, printed at the Black Boy, St. Dunstan's Church, in Fleet Street, exclaims: "As for the great quantity of sugar which is commonly put in, it may destroy the native and genuine temper of the chocolate, sugar being such a corrosive salt, and such an hypocritical enemy of the body."







Excerpted from: The Food of the Gods
A popuar account of cocoa by Brandon Head
LONDON: R. BRIMLEY JOHNSON
4 ADAM STREET, ADELPHI, W.C.1903

To be continued.
In the mean time: subscribe and come back to follow the links for some free choc wrappers.

Anni Arts has professionally designed and illustrated printable crafts, templates and graphics specially created for crafters by designer Anneke Lipsanen http://www.anniarts.com//


Don't miss the Weekend Wrapper series free on this blog. Chocolate wrappers from Vintage graphics with many themes for all occasions! Nothing beats a nice choc slab as a quick gift. Start collecting your arsenal of wrappers.
Find unique cardmaking kits, templates, scrapbooking, chocwrappers, wedding stationery, favors and ebooks to download and print. There's a super Anni Arts Printable Crafts Club, Licenses for Home Business Crafters and many Freebies for Art Mail Subscribers too. And if you like the designs, but are not a crafter, there are many ready goods and online scrapbooks to order.
http://www.anniarts.com/